Commit 87aa075f authored by Amherst College's avatar Amherst College
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2022-06-18 catalog automated update

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<!-- Amherst College Course Catalog Data for Five College Cross Registration-->
<!-- Date: Fri Jun 17 04:00:02 2022 Term: 2223F -->
<!-- Date: Sat Jun 18 04:00:02 2022 Term: 2223F -->
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<SECTION_ID>AMST-203-01-2223F</SECTION_ID>
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<COMMENTS />
<INSTRUCTOR_PERM />
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as ASLC 234 and FAMS 320)&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;This course places equal emphasis on the two key terms of its title, &amp;ldquo;Japan&amp;rdquo; and &amp;ldquo;screen.&amp;rdquo;&amp;nbsp; Is the concept of national cinema useful in the age of globalization?&amp;nbsp; What is the place of cinema in a history of screen culture in Japan?&amp;nbsp; This course aspires to rethink the idea of Japanese cinema while surveying the history of cinema in Japan, from early efforts to disentangle it from fairground spectacles and the theater at the turn of the last century, through the golden age of studio cinema in the 1950s, to the place of film in the contemporary media ecology. This course will investigate the Japanese film as a narrative art, as a formal construct, and as a participant in larger aesthetic, social, and even political contexts.&amp;nbsp; This course includes the major genres of Japanese film, influential schools and movements, and major directors.&amp;nbsp; Additionally, students will learn and get extensive practice using the vocabulary of the discipline of film studies.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Fall semester. Professor Van Compernolle.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as ASLC 234 and FAMS 320) This course places equal emphasis on the two key terms of its title, &amp;ldquo;Japan&amp;rdquo; and &amp;ldquo;screen.&amp;rdquo;&amp;nbsp; Is the concept of national cinema useful in the age of globalization?&amp;nbsp; What is the place of cinema in a history of screen culture in Japan?&amp;nbsp; This course aspires to rethink the idea of Japanese cinema while surveying the history of cinema in Japan, from early efforts to disentangle it from fairground spectacles and the theater at the turn of the last century, through the golden age of studio cinema in the 1950s, to the place of film in the contemporary media ecology. This course will investigate the Japanese film as a narrative art, as a formal construct, and as a participant in larger aesthetic, social, and even political contexts.&amp;nbsp; This course includes the major genres of Japanese film, influential schools and movements, and major directors.&amp;nbsp; Additionally, students will learn and get extensive practice using the vocabulary of the discipline of film studies.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Fall semester. Professor Van Compernolle.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>tvancompernolle@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<LOCATION />
<COMMENTS />
<INSTRUCTOR_PERM />
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as ASLC 234 and FAMS 320)&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;This course places equal emphasis on the two key terms of its title, &amp;ldquo;Japan&amp;rdquo; and &amp;ldquo;screen.&amp;rdquo;&amp;nbsp; Is the concept of national cinema useful in the age of globalization?&amp;nbsp; What is the place of cinema in a history of screen culture in Japan?&amp;nbsp; This course aspires to rethink the idea of Japanese cinema while surveying the history of cinema in Japan, from early efforts to disentangle it from fairground spectacles and the theater at the turn of the last century, through the golden age of studio cinema in the 1950s, to the place of film in the contemporary media ecology. This course will investigate the Japanese film as a narrative art, as a formal construct, and as a participant in larger aesthetic, social, and even political contexts.&amp;nbsp; This course includes the major genres of Japanese film, influential schools and movements, and major directors.&amp;nbsp; Additionally, students will learn and get extensive practice using the vocabulary of the discipline of film studies.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Fall semester. Professor Van Compernolle.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as ASLC 234 and FAMS 320) This course places equal emphasis on the two key terms of its title, &amp;ldquo;Japan&amp;rdquo; and &amp;ldquo;screen.&amp;rdquo;&amp;nbsp; Is the concept of national cinema useful in the age of globalization?&amp;nbsp; What is the place of cinema in a history of screen culture in Japan?&amp;nbsp; This course aspires to rethink the idea of Japanese cinema while surveying the history of cinema in Japan, from early efforts to disentangle it from fairground spectacles and the theater at the turn of the last century, through the golden age of studio cinema in the 1950s, to the place of film in the contemporary media ecology. This course will investigate the Japanese film as a narrative art, as a formal construct, and as a participant in larger aesthetic, social, and even political contexts.&amp;nbsp; This course includes the major genres of Japanese film, influential schools and movements, and major directors.&amp;nbsp; Additionally, students will learn and get extensive practice using the vocabulary of the discipline of film studies.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Fall semester. Professor Van Compernolle.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>tvancompernolle@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<COMMENTS />
<INSTRUCTOR_PERM />
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as SPAN 456, AMST 356 and LLAS 456) In addition to learning about the cultures and ways of Latinxs and those of contemporary indigenous people with ties to Mesoamerica, students will examine notions of the noble savage, the mongrel, the Indian, the Mexican that have informed US hegemonic cultural perceptions, rules of law, and human interactions for centuries. Reading selections of poetry, short stories, short novels, and essays by Latinx, Zapotec, Mixtec, Nahau, and Mayan writers, we will challenge the US imaginings of where&amp;nbsp; &quot;wild tongues&quot; (Anzald&amp;uacute;a, 1987) connect Latinxs to Indigenous peoples of Latin American descent.&amp;nbsp; We will examine aesthetics, plurilingualism, translation, and cultural critique as we consider the investment Latinx writers and artists make in staking self in classical Mesoamerican cultures in contrast to the stakes and gains of contemporary imaginaries of &quot;los Seres Veraderos&quot; (Montemayor, 2005) particularly in poetry and short stories. Students will learn to think critically about suppositions, ideologies, and habits&amp;ndash;visual habits, cognitive habits, emotional habits&amp;ndash;that they espouse and that influence their views of themselves and of others. The methods of knowledge, theory, and cultural appreciation in this course underline the critique, but also vitality, necessity, and beauty of latinidad and of indigeneity.&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;This course is conducted primarily in Spanish.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Requisite: SPAN 301 or consent of the instructor. Fall Semester. Visitng Professor Fetta.&amp;nbsp;&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL />
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
......@@ -23737,7 +23737,7 @@
<LOCATION />
<COMMENTS />
<INSTRUCTOR_PERM />
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as SPAN 456, AMST 356 and LLAS 456) In addition to learning about the cultures and ways of Latinxs and those of contemporary indigenous people with ties to Mesoamerica, students will examine notions of the noble savage, the mongrel, the Indian, the Mexican that have informed US hegemonic cultural perceptions, rules of law, and human interactions for centuries. Reading selections of poetry, short stories, short novels, and essays by Latinx, Zapotec, Mixtec, Nahau, and Mayan writers, we will challenge the US imaginings of where&amp;nbsp; &quot;wild tongues&quot; (Anzald&amp;uacute;a, 1987) connect Latinxs to Indigenous peoples of Latin American descent.&amp;nbsp; We will examine aesthetics, plurilingualism, translation, and cultural critique as we consider the investment Latinx writers and artists make in staking self in classical Mesoamerican cultures in contrast to the stakes and gains of contemporary imaginaries of &quot;los Seres Veraderos&quot; (Montemayor, 2005) particularly in poetry and short stories. Students will learn to think critically about suppositions, ideologies, and habits&amp;ndash;visual habits, cognitive habits, emotional habits&amp;ndash;that they espouse and that influence their views of themselves and of others. The methods of knowledge, theory, and cultural appreciation in this course underline the critique, but also vitality, necessity, and beauty of latinidad and of indigeneity.&amp;nbsp;&amp;nbsp;This course is conducted primarily in Spanish.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Requisite: SPAN 301 or consent of the instructor. Fall Semester. Visitng Professor Fetta.&amp;nbsp;&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>tdepartment@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as SPAN 471 and LLAS 471) The bloody dictatorships that took place in the Southern Cone and the armed conflicts in Colombia, Guatemala and Peru during the twentieth century left behind a legacy of political violence and collective trauma. These states themselves became sadistic death machines, where bodies became territories of punishment and discipline as well as of struggle, resistance, and difference. We will analyze how recent cultural production (film, novel, short stories, and theater) along with theoretical texts imagine and represent those &quot;body struggles&quot; through queer and female bodies, and how they replace the masculine icons of the left-wing militants and the state military terrorists.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;The course is conducted in Spanish.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Requisite: SPAN 301 or consent of instructor. Fall Semester. Visiting Pitetta.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>tdepartment@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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