Commit 446cd66b authored by Amherst College's avatar Amherst College
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2022-06-15 catalog automated update

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<!-- Amherst College Course Catalog Data for Five College Cross Registration-->
<!-- Date: Tue Jun 14 04:00:02 2022 Term: 2223F -->
<!-- Date: Wed Jun 15 04:00:02 2022 Term: 2223F -->
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<SECTION_ID>AMST-203-01-2223F</SECTION_ID>
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<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as AMST 203, EDST 203, and SOCI 203) What do we understand about schools, teachers, and students through our engagement with popular culture? How do we interrogate youth clothing as a site of cultural expression and school-based control? How do race, class, and gender shape how youth make sense of and navigate cultural events such as the prom? Contemporary educational debates often position schools and popular culture as oppositional and as vying for youth's allegiance. Yet schools and popular culture overlap as educational sites in the lives of youth. In this course, we will employ feminist, critical race, and cultural studies perspectives to analyze representations of schooling and youth in popular culture. By doing so, we will consider the historically shifting meaning of youth, interrogate an oppositional stance to school and popular culture, and examine relationships of power and representation in educational sites. Readings, class discussions, and frequent film screenings will support our examination.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Limited to 25 students. Fall semester. Visiting Professor Luschen.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
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<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>kluschen@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
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<INSTRUCTOR_PERM>Y</INSTRUCTOR_PERM>
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;Sports infiltrate American lives.&amp;nbsp; Whether we are active participants, fans, or only disinterested consumers of media, we cannot escape the influence sport has on American society. Moreover, the world of sports is the place where discussions of major societal issues&amp;mdash;racism, gender inequality, labor rights&amp;mdash;most prominently arise in the public sphere. Media often point to sport as being emblematic of the most powerful myths about American culture and identity. Yet, few people have an appreciation for how sports in American society and their meaning have evolved over time. This course is designed to offer such an understanding and promote critical analysis of the role of sports in our individual and collective lives. We will study and discuss contemporary scholarship on the history of American sport, from roughly 1800 to the present, as well as related literature and documentary film.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Limited to 25 students.&amp;nbsp; Fall semester.&amp;nbsp; Professor Hayashi.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
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<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>rhayashi@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
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<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as AMST 240 [Pre-1900], EDST-240 and SWAG 243) From Longfellow&amp;rsquo;s &lt;em&gt;Hiawatha &lt;/em&gt;and D.H. Lawrence&amp;rsquo;s &lt;em&gt;Studies in Classic American Literature&lt;/em&gt; to Disney&amp;rsquo;s &lt;em&gt;Pocahontas &lt;/em&gt;and more recently &lt;em&gt;Moana&lt;/em&gt; to James Cameron&amp;rsquo;s &lt;em&gt;Avatar, &lt;/em&gt;representations of the Indigenous as &amp;ldquo;Other&amp;rdquo; have greatly shaped cultural production in America as vehicles for defining the nation and the self. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the broad field of Native American and Indigenous Studies, by engaging a range of texts from law to policy to history and literature as well as music and aesthetics. Film will also provide grounding for our inquiries. By keeping popular culture, representation, and the nature of historical narratives in mind, we will consider the often mutually constitutive relationship between American identity and Indian identity as we pose the following questions: How have imaginings of a national space and national culture by Americans been shaped by a history marked by conquest and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples? And, how have the myths of conquest become a part of education and popular representations to mask settler colonial policies and practices that seek to &amp;ldquo;erase in order to replace&amp;rdquo; the Native? This course also considers how categories like race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion have defined identities and changed over time with particular regards to specific Native American individuals and tribal nations. Students will be able to design their own final research project. It may focus on either a historically contingent or contemporary issue related to Native American people in the United States that is driven by a researchable question based on working with an Indigenous author&amp;rsquo;s writings from the Kim-Wait/Pablo Eisenberg (or KWE for short) collection of Native American Literature books in the archives of Amherst College.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Fall semester.&amp;nbsp; Professor Vigil.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
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<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>kvigil@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
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