Commit 37316790 authored by Amherst College's avatar Amherst College
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2022-06-25 catalog automated update

parent b8d7e873
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<!-- Amherst College Course Catalog Data for Five College Cross Registration-->
<!-- Date: Fri Jun 24 04:00:01 2022 Term: 2223F -->
<!-- Date: Sat Jun 25 04:00:02 2022 Term: 2223F -->
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<SECTION_ID>AMST-203-01-2223F</SECTION_ID>
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<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;Representations of people in the United States, on the level of the individual and the collective, referring to the self and the nation, have often engaged in and produced a discourse concerning the soul and salvation. This course asks students to engage with literary, intellectual, and artistic articulations of the soul and the nation, from African-American intellectual writings, like W.E.B. DuBois&amp;rsquo; &lt;em&gt;The Souls of Blackfolks&lt;/em&gt; (1903), and Indigenous representations, such as Charles Eastman&amp;rsquo;s &lt;em&gt;The Soul of the Indian &lt;/em&gt;(1911), to musical works, like &amp;ldquo;Hot Buttered Soul&amp;rdquo; by Isaac Hayes (1969) and Stevie Wonder&amp;rsquo;s &amp;ldquo;Songs in the Key of Life&amp;rdquo; (1976), as well as films such as the Disney-Pixar animated feature &lt;em&gt;Soul&lt;/em&gt;&amp;nbsp;(2020). Using these texts to ground our discussions students will explore the following questions: What does it mean to have a soul within and outside of sacred epistemologies? How does the concept of soul connect the sacred with the secular in American popular culture? Why did the Biden Presidential Campaign of 2020 frame its platform as &amp;ldquo;saving the soul of a nation&quot;? Can a nation have a soul? How did soul come to signify a cultural belief in black resilience, enacted through musical practices, during the 1960s? In the nineteenth century, how was the Judeo-Christian concept of salvation used to justify and expand settler colonial practices, in order to &amp;ldquo;Kill the Indian, but Save the Man&amp;rdquo;? In this course students will ground their responses to these questions and others by reading an array of theoretical texts as we interrogate the meaning of soul in American culture and history in relation to racism and colonization. Students will also generate their own researchable questions to expand their understanding of the social and personal meanings of soul as framed by studies in critical race theory, Indigeneity and colonialism, and literary criticism. In addition, students will practice interdisciplinary methods from American Studies as they examine a wide-array of materials: music, film, visual art, popular culture, printed primary sources, and literature.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Limited to 20 students.&amp;nbsp; Fall semester.&amp;nbsp; Professor Vigil.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>kvigil@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<COMMENTS />
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<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;This course introduces students to sociological analyses of undocumented migrations between Central America, Mexico, and the United States. An exploration of undocumented immigration demands that we engage with oft-unexamined social and economic contradictions. Namely, whereas capital and culture move freely across most international borders, many people cannot. Walls - physical, legal, and social - aim to keep certain people in and &amp;ldquo;others&amp;rdquo; out. Yet, people do cross international borders and many do so without the legal authorization to make their moves formal and secure. In this course we explore the sociological forces behind these insecure migrations between Central America, Mexico, and the US, and the reality of undocumented immigrant life in the United States. While this course has a deep theoretical rooting, we use daily life as the lens through which to explore immigration and enforcement policies, and our individual and collective relationships to them.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Limited to 25 students.&amp;nbsp; Fall semester.&amp;nbsp; Professor Schmalzbauer&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>lschmalzbauer@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<VAR_CREDIT_COMMENTS />
<YEAR>2022</YEAR>
<SEMESTER>F</SEMESTER>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian C. Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<TYPE />
<MEETING_INFO>MW 01:00 PM-01:50 PM</MEETING_INFO>
<LOCATION />
......@@ -8450,7 +8450,7 @@
<VAR_CREDIT_COMMENTS />
<YEAR>2022</YEAR>
<SEMESTER>F</SEMESTER>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian C. Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<TYPE />
<MEETING_INFO>F 01:00 PM-01:50 PM</MEETING_INFO>
<LOCATION />
......@@ -8487,7 +8487,7 @@
<VAR_CREDIT_COMMENTS />
<YEAR>2022</YEAR>
<SEMESTER>F</SEMESTER>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian C. Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<TYPE />
<MEETING_INFO>F 02:00 PM-02:50 PM</MEETING_INFO>
<LOCATION />
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<VAR_CREDIT_COMMENTS />
<YEAR>2022</YEAR>
<SEMESTER>F</SEMESTER>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<INSTRUCTOR>Lillian C. Pentecost</INSTRUCTOR>
<TYPE />
<MEETING_INFO>MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM</MEETING_INFO>
<LOCATION />
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<LOCATION />
<COMMENTS />
<INSTRUCTOR_PERM>Y</INSTRUCTOR_PERM>
<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;(Offered as SOCI 337 and EDST 337) In this course, we will focus on the diversification of higher education. We will pay particular attention to efforts made by selective liberal arts colleges and universities to open their doors to students disadvantaged by barriers of racial discrimination and excluded by the means of class privilege. We will critically interrogate the concept of diversity and its implementation, paying attention to both successes and problems. Among these problems is the gap between a diversity promised and a diversity delivered.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;We will employ sociological theories and concepts to explore this gap, the dilemmas it presents, and the cultural strategies that have emerged in response to them. Situating contemporary efforts of selective colleges and universities to diversify in historical context, we will pay particular attention to broader transformation of racial and class discourse in the United States in the post civil rights era, including federal efforts to address discrimination, Supreme Court decisions regarding race-based admissions policy, changes in corporate personnel policies, the rise of &amp;ldquo;colorblind&amp;rdquo; rhetoric, growing economic inequality, and the expansion of neoliberal policies and practices in higher education today. Drawing on this context, we will assess the strengths and weaknesses of diversity initiatives that have been put into place, the patterns of cultural change occurring on campuses, and the role social difference can play in constructing alternatives to inclusive communities as we presently envision them.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Students will be encouraged to work collaboratively and will employ a variety of methods to document systematically the current state of diversity on their respective campuses.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Requisite: SOCI 112 or equivalent. Limited to 15 students. Admission with consent of the instructor. Fall semester. Professor Lembo.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>ralembo@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<COMMENTS />
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<DESCRIPTION>&lt;p&gt;Independent reading course. A full course.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Fall and spring semesters. The Department.&lt;/p&gt;</DESCRIPTION>
<DESCRIPTION />
<INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>tdepartment@amherst.edu</INSTRUCTOR_EMAIL>
<INSTITUTION>A</INSTITUTION>
<URL />
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<!-- University of Massachusetts Amherst Staff Directory for Five Colleges -->
<!-- Generated 23-JUN-2022-->
<!-- Generated 24-JUN-2022-->
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<FCID_NUMBER>30491261@UMASS.EDU</FCID_NUMBER>
......@@ -23979,7 +23979,7 @@
<INSTITUTION>UMASS Amherst</INSTITUTION>
<TELEPHONE1>413-545-0622</TELEPHONE1>
<OFFICE_BUILDING>Lederle Grad Research Tower</OFFICE_BUILDING>
<EMAIL_ADDRESS>conlon@math.umass.edu</EMAIL_ADDRESS>
<EMAIL_ADDRESS>econlon@mathstat.umass.edu</EMAIL_ADDRESS>
<FACULTY>1</FACULTY>
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<PERSON>
......@@ -121764,8 +121764,8 @@
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<PERSON>
<FCID_NUMBER>30679845@UMASS.EDU</FCID_NUMBER>
<FULL_NAME>Ram K Tiwari</FULL_NAME>
<FIRST_NAME>Ram</FIRST_NAME>
<FULL_NAME>Raman K Tiwari</FULL_NAME>
<FIRST_NAME>Raman</FIRST_NAME>
<MIDDLE_NAME>K</MIDDLE_NAME>
<LAST_NAME>Tiwari</LAST_NAME>
<FULL_NICKNAME></FULL_NICKNAME>
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